Extreme traveling salesman

May 2015
516
32
Arlington, VA
Is there a correlation (e.g., space and spacetime in special relativity) between minimum or maximum possible distances covered by the traveling salesman?
 
Dec 2012
1,028
24
The real case depends on too many factors... please try to refine your problem.

You know that also for a good computer to find the better /shortest way to visit 30 customer will be a hard job... (try to computate 30!)

Thanks
ciao
Stefano
 
Last edited by a moderator:
Dec 2013
1,117
41
The real case depends on too many factors... please try to refine your problem.

You know that also for a good computer to find the better /shortest way to visit 30 customer will be a hard job... (try to computate 30!)

Thanks
ciao
Stefano
30!!!???
Google the main site dedicated to the TSP. They have a game where you can choose up to 100 (if I remember or maybe more). Play this game to understand the problem.
 
Last edited by a moderator:
Dec 2012
1,028
24
Mobel you're fully unable to understand what is a kindly suggestion to refine the problem.

For your information I'm a businessman, I've 7 salesman and more than 5000 customers. I directly delivery with my trucks the goods, so I'm playing on the problem with my money.

If you left open ANY condition, without choosing some good choice, the problem is heavy in term of computation...

UPS is the first carrier that study and use a dedicated software for his delivery. UPS trucks are GPS controlled and in the big cities they turn just right... etc...

Pls what do you think you add to this post with your insulting (removed by the administrator) words ?

Returning on the point: it's clear that if you can keep black hole/space tunnel... short-cut... the road will be shorter, or zero. If you can travel in time, distance will be irrelevant...

I ask for more details since the Loren's question is, minimum, O.T. if in this terms just...

Thanks
ciao
Stefano
 
Last edited:
Jul 2015
30
8
tbilisi
There is such a thing as a nearly optimal algorithms behavior.
They allow you to find a path with no more computation.
Mathematicians do not like them and curse a lot. But in practice, many use them.
I like very interesting to test some algorithms. Therefore, it is best to formulate concrete.
The easiest way. Write the number of the point and its coordinates on the plane. \(\displaystyle N(x;y)\)
And put a condition - to find the optimal path from a point to another.
 
May 2015
516
32
Arlington, VA
In their two regards, minimization and maximization of length occur in space and spacetime, respectively, as a general rule for straight lines. The TSP might be recognized as either a minimization or, correlatively, a maximization of a path.

In Euclidian space, the shortest distance between two points is a straight line. In spacetime, however, the longest distance between two points is a straight line. With the TSP, maybe they can be considered two sides of the same coin. One side seems to work in spherical geometry on our globe.

What creates this seeming shortest/longest anomaly is that time appears in Pythagorean special or general relativistic spacetime reasoning as an "imaginary" rather than "real" magnitude. This infers curved space, as opposed to flat Euclidean space. However, traveling between two points on the Earth's surface maximizes their relative distance compared to tunneling directly though the Earth.
 
Dec 2012
1,028
24
In their two regards, minimization and maximization of length occur in space and spacetime, respectively, as a general rule for straight lines. The TSP might be recognized as either a minimization or, correlatively, a maximization of a path.

In Euclidian space, the shortest distance between two points is a straight line. In spacetime, however, the longest distance between two points is a straight line. With the TSP, maybe they can be considered two sides of the same coin. One side seems to work in spherical geometry on our globe.

What creates this seeming shortest/longest anomaly is that time appears in Pythagorean special or general relativistic spacetime reasoning as an "imaginary" rather than "real" magnitude. This infers curved space, as opposed to flat Euclidean space. However, traveling between two points on the Earth's surface maximizes their relative distance compared to tunneling directly though the Earth.
1) You probably forgot that the shortest distance betweens 2 points on the sphere IS NOT A LINE, but a curve called "great-circle distance".

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great-circle_distance

2) Also for mobel here good news on that problem:

Researchers create a new type of computer that can solve problems that are a challenge for traditional computers

ciao
Stefano