Math Audio Book

Mar 2011
3
0
I know there are many lectures available online. But I feel that lectures are usually not as clearly worded or as well thought out as books are. After all, a lecturer usually only has a week to put together a lecture, whereas a writer usually compiles his/her book over several years. And then, a writer even has the luxury of improving his writing in a later edition.

I have seen some audio books for "pop-math", including Fermat's Enigma by Sinhh. But I am looking for something like Hurstein's Abstract Algebra, or Willard's General Topology, except read aloud. Something that covers most, if not all, the material you might encounter in class.
 
Nov 2010
502
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Are you being serious? Is there a particular reason you don't want to just read Herstein's Algebra?

For all i know, there are many of you out there, and you could make some money if you created these... but I find it hard to imagine people listening to them.
 
Mar 2011
3
0
I'd love to read them, but I think it would be easier if I could listen at least part of it in the car. Also, I don't like straining my eyes.

Inevitably, for the problem sections I'll need time to sit down and solve the problems, but at least when he's just giving examples, definitions and theorems I don't think it's as necessary. Furthermore, it's easier to listen and relisten to certain chapters on your iPod while your waiting in line, than to try to carry a book and fumble through the pages to reread stuff you'd like to really remember.

A lot of other forms of media don't get as much respect as books. But really, I think this is primarily because they haven't been around as long and there just aren't as many great works in those forms.
 

CRGreathouse

Forum Staff
Nov 2006
16,046
936
UTC -5
math4tots said:
A lot of other forms of media don't get as much respect as books. But really, I think this is primarily because they haven't been around as long and there just aren't as many great works in those forms.
When writing was first introduced to ancient Greece it was looked down upon because there was concern that it would destroy the ability of future generations to give oral histories. :D

I think the main problem with doing math this way is that most of it is too difficult to juggle in your head without being able to use paper (etc.) to hold the intermediate steps. Unless, of course, your name rhymes with "spoiler".
 
Nov 2010
502
0
CRGreathouse said:
Unless, of course, your name rhymes with "spoiler".
During my first few times being a TA, I corrected people's pronunciation of Euler very often. Upon occasion, I also liked to 'correct' people's pronunciation of Euclid (oy klid).
 

CRGreathouse

Forum Staff
Nov 2006
16,046
936
UTC -5
I try to avoid correcting pronunciation too much... it's a long, dark, slippery road that ends with me hating people who say "dzhooleeus seezer" rather than "yooleeoos kaysar" for IVLIVS·CAESAR.

:D
 
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