Music and mathematics

Apr 2011
782
1
USA
That list means nothing. For one thing, it's all in the way something is applied. It doesn't prove there's no correlation. Second, I've known some people from (deleted so as not to insult anyone, but from "elsewhere") who could plug stuff into equations and solve all day, but had no brains whatsoever to think freely on their own. They were too technical and couldn't think outside the box. Unfortunately, the US is heading that direction as well. Point being, how do we define who is "best" at math? What constitutes good? What judgments were used in making an order?

I too am a musician. And I see the correlation. But I also see something in the type of analysis one can use - that is, like the example of building up chords. I see that as a similar analysis process.

But I also know some people who are really good at both math and science, and they can sit and "analyze" music all day, but they're terrible musicians. Because there's the other side of music that has nothing to do with math. :wink:
 
May 2008
1,300
0
York, UK
Well, to be fair, you can't really list countries in order without some explanation of what you mean. Largest number of professional musicians/mathematicians? Largest number of elite musicians/mathematicians? Best teaching strategies for music/maths?

All countries produce brilliant musicians, and brilliant mathematicians. To be frank, your lists look entirely arbitrary. I would say that there is certainly no evidence to suggest, for example, that Chinese people are naturally better at mathematics than people of any other nationality. And as to how you quantify musical ability, I have no idea.
 
Apr 2007
2,140
0
The lists are the rankings, not the best, e.g. all Chinese are smart at mathematics but almost all Italians are smart at mathematics. If we exclude the Italians that aren't smart at mathematics, then combining all Chinese and Italians(that weren't excluded), most likely there will be a lot of Italians that are smarter at mathematics.
 
Apr 2011
782
1
USA
Yes I got the idea that they were rankings. In the context of this thread, it's implying there's a negative correlation between math and musicians, regardless of the criteria you're using to generate the rank. Which is the entire point. It will depend on the criteria used. How do you define "smart" at mathematics? How do you define a good musician? Maybe you can put it all in that order, based on some certain set of criteria. But if you used a different set of criteria, it might come out different.

So in the context of this discussion, I'm pretty sure it means nothing, yes.
 
Jan 2011
106
0
Erimess, you've got to get used to johnny's country-rankings and list-makings for every single topic.
 
Jan 2011
106
0
Just came to me, the converse of this concept also worths noticing: mathematicians with a musical background.
Well, I for one can mention Per Enflo, as a brilliant example.
 
Feb 2020
15
1
Indonesia
I know A female Japanese Pianist who won international math olympics 1996 and 1997. Her name is Sachiko Nakajima. These are the links on which it is demonstrated that she is playing her own jazz composition : "Flower of Hope".
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Below also a link to her presentation in math and music.
Please Click on the link below to check her achievement in IMO competition.
International Mathematical Olympiad
 
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Feb 2020
15
1
Indonesia
Another mathematician and musician is Manjul Bhargava. He won the fields medal in 2014 and also a tabla player. Below is the links to the video when he was awarded fields medal and when he was playing tabla.

 
Feb 2020
15
1
Indonesia
Another persons who believes math and music is connected are Sean Hardesty and Laura Frautschi and Eugenia Cheng.