Speed of sound

May 2017
21
0
Monaco
I was listening to thunderclaps whilst I was sleeping in bed, very loud ones which I thought were explosions.

Something about it was very engine-like.

Very very loud I thought I was in Iraq.

So I was thinking what if you applied heat energy to a sound wave. How fast would it go?

Sound waves are all about the same speed if I remember.

I looked online, and I saw only sound effects for heat.

Maybe some users here have some knowledge about this?

What I do appreciate is that during a sonic boom, there are some heat transfers involved when you break Mach 1.

If you apply considerable heat to a sound wave, what happens?

Perhaps sound is just vibrations from what I remember. Maybe it is a wave too.

Or if you apply enough energy to a radio wave - I know that these are waves for sure.
 

romsek

Math Team
Sep 2015
2,959
1,673
USA
How would you apply heat to the sound wave? What does that even mean?

Do you mean heating up the medium the wave is travelling in?

In general, heating a material decreases its density. In general (and perhaps always), the speed of sound is slower in a less dense material.
 
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Country Boy

Math Team
Jan 2015
3,261
899
Alabama
It's not a matter of "adding heat to the sound" wave but rather heating the medium, air or water, etc.

Perhaps sound is just vibrations from what I remember. Maybe it is a wave too.
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Yes, sound is vibrations in the medium- and that is exactly what a wave is!