The N-Body Problem or the Uncertainty Principle?

May 2014
116
6
Allentown PA USA
Dear My Math Form Members:
Could the N-body problem be a macroscopic manifestation of the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle?
 

topsquark

Math Team
May 2013
2,524
1,049
The Astral plane
Dear My Math Form Members:
Could the N-body problem be a macroscopic manifestation of the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle?
The Heisenberg principle is best described, to my mind, using the wave picture of QM and represents the impossibilty of precise measurement of the position of the wave due to the nature of the wave tending to spread out.

The N-body problem is due to the lack of existence of closed form solutions to the equations of motion.

These are very different things.

-Dan
 
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SDK

Sep 2016
804
544
USA
Dear My Math Form Members:
Could the N-body problem be a macroscopic manifestation of the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle?
Can you explain what you think the N-body problem is? Also describe what you think the Heisenberg uncertainty principle says.
 
May 2014
116
6
Allentown PA USA
The Heisenberg principle is best described, to my mind, using the wave picture of QM and represents the impossibilty of precise measurement of the position of the wave due to the nature of the wave tending to spread out.

The N-body problem is due to the lack of existence of closed form solutions to the equations of motion.

These are very different things.

-Dan
 
May 2014
116
6
Allentown PA USA
Dear My Math Forum Members:
The fundamental reason why I equated the N-body problem with the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle is that both deal with events (with the Heisenberg Principle of the microworld and the N-body problem of the macroworld) that cannot be predicted.
 

SDK

Sep 2016
804
544
USA
Dear My Math Forum Members:
The fundamental reason why I equated the N-body problem with the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle is that both deal with events (with the Heisenberg Principle of the microworld and the N-body problem of the macroworld) that cannot be predicted.
This is why I asked the question I did. You seem to be having a fundamental misunderstanding of both the N body problem and the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle. Neither the N-body problem or the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle has anything to do with, or makes any statements about "events that cannot be predicted". Your question seemed familiar and after checking it seems you asked something similar in September. Rather than rewriting the same reply I did back then, here is the link. Please read the comments that topsquark and myself (and others) made in that thread.
 
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topsquark

Math Team
May 2013
2,524
1,049
The Astral plane
SDK lost the link somehow. Here it is.

Just to be clear on the N-body problem: There is no uncertainty there. We can make numerical predictions with just about any accuracy desired, at least in the short term. Yes, there are possible chaotic effects but unless you are trying to predict something to happen in 1000 years or can invent/use equipement that can make measurements far better than we have now the numerical work will do you just fine. It seems to work well enough for NASA and other country's space agencies.

-Dan
 
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SDK

Sep 2016
804
544
USA
SDK lost the link somehow. Here it is.
Oops thanks for that. I am spoiled on google telling me when I have used the word "attached" in an email but haven't attached anything. Saves me from looking stupid ~10x a day but it only promotes bad habits.
 
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